Bari

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WorldMediterraneanAdriatic SeaItalyAdriatic Coast of ItalyBari
Bari
41°8.22′N, 16°51.22′E Chart icon.png
BariVecchio.jpg
Magnify-clip.png
Bari Porto Vecchio from S with Porto Nuovo

The port of Bari lies on the Adriatic coast of Italy roughly halfway between the extreme ‘heel’ of the peninsula at Santa Maria de Leuca and the ‘spur’ of the peninsula at Vieste on the Gargano promontory. The capital of the Apulia region, Bari is southern Italy’s most important city after Naples. During the Roman period, Bari rivalled Brindisi as one of the most important outlets for trade with the eastern empire. Later, under Byzantine rule, Bari was one of the major slave trading outlets in the Western Mediterranean, shipping hundreds of thousands of captives to markets among the Muslim states of the Eastern Mediterranean. The Normans under Robert Guiscard subsequently captured the port in 1071 and soon after began the construction of the magnificent Basilica of St Nicholas to receive the remains of the eponymous saint. The relics had been ‘rescued’ from the city of Myra in what is now modern Turkey by local merchants to ‘save’ them from the clutches of the Selcuk Turkish forces then threatening the eastern borders of the Byzantine empire. It was also under Norman rule that work began on the city’s so-called Castello Svevo, subsequently enlarged in the 16th century to its present impressive size. Today Bari is an important shipping and passenger port, with regular ferries to Dubrovnik in Croatia and several Greek ports. Its Porto Vecchio (smaller vessels up to 12 metres) and Porto Nuovo (vessels up to 100 metres) both offer berthing opportunities to yachts in transit along the Adriatic coast or arriving from/departing to Croatia.

Charts

British Admiralty
186
Italian
921
30
31
193
195

Weather

During the summer months the prevailing winds in the Adriatic are light to moderate coastal seabreezes. In spring and autumn, northerly winds are more frequent and can quickly rise to near gale force, especially in the northern Adriatic, where the much-feared “bora” is caused by high pressure over the mountains to the NE coupled with low pressure over southern Italy. Fortunately, the fiercest “bora” is normally to be expected in the winter months. Thunderstorms are occasionally experienced in spring and especially autumn and can be accompanied by violent winds of gale force and above. Luckily they are rarely long-lasting. In the southern Adriatic, the “scirocco”, a S/SE wind blowing up from North Africa which can last for several days, is more common. Unlike the “bora”, which can arrive without warning, a “scirocco” tends to build in strength over 24-48 hours, sometimes reaching gale force (especially in winter).

Sources for weather information:

  • There is a continuous (computerised voice) weather forecast on VHF 68 - first in Italian and then followed with an English translation
  • The same forecast is given in Italian and English on VHF coastal stations following a notification on channel 16
  • Navtex weather forecasts covering the Adriatic are broadcast from stations at Roma, Trieste, Kerkyra (Greece) and Split (Croatia)

Passages

See Adriatic.

Islands

None.

Communication

Also see World Cruiser's Nets.

Navigation

Porto Nuovo is the northernmost of the two harbours of Bari. The harbour lies behind a long breakwater extending N then W from the shore. Behind the breakwater a white octagonal lighthouse is conspicuous on the shore. The harbour is entered from NW, being careful to avoid commercial shipping entering or leaving the harbour. Note: in the approach from S, beware of the dangerous shoal of Secca del Monte which lies around 500 metres offshore in the bight between the breakwaters of the old and new harbours.

Porto Vecchio Is situated one mile SE of Porto Nuovo. The harbour is protected by a long breakwater oriented NW/SE with a conspicuous white light tower on the end. Note: in the approach from N, beware of the dangerous shoal of Secca del Monte which lies around 500 metres offshore in the bight between the breakwaters of the old and new harbours. A series of detached breakwaters lies parallel to the shore for a mile in the approach from S. The harbour is entered from ESE between a final detached breakwater extending NNW perpendicular to the others and the end of the long breakwater. Depths in the entrance are 3.0 - 4.0 metres.

Entrance

Bari is a port of entry to Italy.

Submit details about facilities for checking in - location of immigration & customs, etc.

Berthing

Porto Nuovo

Entrance to Bari Porto Nuovo from NW

World icon.png 41°8.08′N, 16°50.89′E - Chartlet
There are several berthing options in the Porto Nuovo: immediately to starboard on entering the harbour, 500 metres from the entrance, is a series of pontoons managed by the Centro Universitario Sportivo (telephone: +39 080 5341660), with 250 berths for vessels up to 23 metres. Depths are 2.5 - 3.0 metres. Water and electricity at all berths. Berthing here is restricted to members only, although it may be possible for a visiting yacht to find space here outside busy periods. At the northern end of the Centro Universitario Sportivo moorings is the yard of Nautica Ranieri (telephone: +39 080 5344888),email: info@raineri-bari.com, http://www.ranieri-bari.com, which has moorings for vessels of up to 5.0 metres draft. There is a shower and toilet, and free wifi, sometimes. No laundry service although they plan to install machines in 2018.

The most likely option, however, is on the long pontoon operated by the Italian Lega Navale in the Darsena Vecchia (Old Basin) at the SE end of the harbour. Here there are 70 berths for yachts up to 16 metres. Depths at the pontoon are 2.5 - 3.5 metres. Water and electricity on the pontoon. It is quite a long walk from here to get out of the port. Finally, larger yachts are permitted to berth alongside the Banchina Dogana (Customs Quay) and Banchina Capitaneria (Harbourmaster’s Quay) NE of the Lega Navale berths with the permission of the harbour authorities. Depths on the quays are 5.0 - 11.0 metres.

Porto Vecchio

Entrance to Bari Porto Vecchio from SE

World icon.png 41°7.6′N, 16°52.64′E - Chartlet
The Porto Vecchio has berthing spaces for up to 230 smaller yachts (maximum size 12 metres). Berths are on pontoons operated by the Circulo Barion (130 places) on the Mola Nicola, the mole extending into the middle of the harbour, and the Circulo della Vela (100 places) on the smaller mole in the SW corner. The harbour is subject to silting and depths at the pontoons range from 1.5 - 3.0 metres. All berths here are private and may only be used with permission from the respective clubs.

Marinas & Yacht Clubs

Anchorages

Anchoring is forbidden in both the Porto Nuovo and Porto Vecchio.

Yacht Repairs and Services

Marine Stores

Submit addresses and contact details of marine related businesses that are of interest to cruisers.

Repairs/Yards

In Porto Nuovo: Slipway. Travel lift (100 T). Fixed crane (50 T). Mobile crane (16 T). Some hard standing. Engine, electrical and electronic repairs. Wood, fiberglass and steel hull repairs. Sail repairs. Divers.

In Porto Vecchio: Slipway. Fixed crane (40 T). Mobile crane (16 - 100 T). Limited wood and fiberglass repairs.

Fuel, Water, & Electricity

Fuel stations in both the Porto Nuovo and Porto Vecchio. Water and electricity on the club pontoons.

Things to do Ashore

Basilica of St Nicholas
The 13th century Castello Svevo
The cave system of Grotte di Castellana
Trulli houses in Alberobello

Tourism

The Basilica of St Nicholas, founded in 1087 to receive the relics of the saint, is a must-see. The remains of St Nicholas (he of Father Christmas fame) lie in a wonderfully atmospheric crypt under the nave. The beautifully restored Romanesque cathedral is also well worth a visit. The massively impressive Castello Svevo (Swabian castle), rebuilt in the 13th century by Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, dominates the peninsula between the two harbours. Finally, with transport it is possible within a day to visit the impressive cave system of Grotte di Castellana and the World Heritage site of Alberobello with its unique trulli houses.

Grocery & Supply Stores

Numerous provisions shops in the town.

Eateries

Numerous restaurants and pizzerias inland from the harbours.

Internet/WiFi

Internet cafes in the town.

Laundry

None.

Motorbike & Car Rentals

Several rental outlets in the town.

Garbage Disposal

Bins near all pontoons.

Transportation

  • Buses to Grotte di Castellana and other local destinations.
  • Local and international flights from Bari airport (11 kms).
  • Train connections to most major cities.

Friends

Contact details of "Cruiser's Friends" that can be contacted for local information or assistance.

  • In Bari, Italy we needed to buy a car. After much frustration trying to communicate with sellers we found Gianluca on a local travel guide site who does personal guided tours and speaks fluent English and Italian. We asked him if he would mind assisting us and he was happy to help. He made calls, arranged to meet sellers, drove us to see cars and helped with all the paperwork in buying, registering etc. He also dropped our laundry off (and negotiated a cheaper price ) and is happy to help out other cruisers with anything they might need. He also dropped our friends at the airport (less expensive than a cab). When I suggested he perform a similar service to Saverio he said he would be very interested and was going to contact the local marinas with his details if anyone needs groceries, a driver or anything. He can be contacted at Email. --Sephina
  • (Oct 2014) We contacted Gianluca from the link in Sephina's notes and organised a whole day trip to Matera, Alberobello and Polignano. Worked out at about Euros 20 per hour, which between three of us was good value. Had a great day. He recommends afternoon/evening as the latter two towns are nice at night. --Hogesinwa

Forums

List links to discussion threads on partnering forums. (see link for requirements)

Links

  • Bari at the Wikipedia

References & Publications

See Italy.

Comments

We welcome users' contributions to the Wiki. Please click on Comments to view other users' comments, add your own personal experiences or recommend any changes to this page following your visit.

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Names: Lighthouse, Athene of Lymington


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