Dubrovnik

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WorldMediterraneanAdriatic SeaCroatiaDubrovnik
Dubrovnik
42°38.36′N, 18°6.81′E Chart icon.png
DubrovnikAerial.jpg
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The World Heritage listed site of Dubrovnik

The mediaeval walled city of Dubrovnik is the most renowned tourist site in Croatia and has been a World Heritage listed site since 1979. Badly damaged during the Croatian War of Independence in 1991-2 in an attack that brought universal condemnation on the Serbian attackers, the city has since been completely restored and only a few shrapnel scars remain to testify to its former desecration. The city and its commercial harbour of Gruz lie on the Adriatic coast of Croatia near the SE extremity of the country’s long coastline, some 27 miles NW of the border with Montenegro. Two miles NNE of the old city, up the long river inlet of Rijeka Dubrovacka, lies the ACI-operated Marina Dubrovnik on the S side of the inlet, which offers 425 berths for yachts of up to 75 metres in depths of up to 5.0 metres. Dubrovnik is a popular port of entry for foreign yachts, which need to check in at the commercial harbour of Gruz before proceeding to a berth, as well as a magnet for land tourists from all over the world. Not for nothing does the city bear the proud title of ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’.

Charts

British Admiralty
1580
683
Croatian
100-21
Imray
M25

Weather

Diurnal winds along the coast are mostly moderate during the summer months, predominantly from NW and rarely exceeding force 4/5. At night, katabatic winds off the mountains are a feature of some of the harbours along the NE Adriatic coast. During early spring and (especially) autumn conditions can be more unsettled, occasionally accompanied by violent thunderstorms - luckily of short duration - with winds of 30-35 knots or more and vicious, steep seas. In the winter the sudden, violent N wind off the mountains, the bora, is much to be feared, especially in the N Adriatic. It tends, however, to blow less strongly S of Zadar.

Equally prevalent in winter - although not uncommon in summer - is the scirocco, a S/SE wind that blows up from North Africa, usually in advance of a depression moving E across the Mediterranean. Unlike the bora, the scirocco only occasionally exceeds gale force, but is still a phenomenon to be wary of, especially if on a lee coast.

For sources of weather forecasting, see Croatia.

Passages

See Croatia.

Islands

Communication

Also see World Cruiser's Nets.

Navigation

In the approach from N, leave the islet of Otocic Daksa to starboard and steer for the light structure on Rt. Kantafig, the headland just to the right of the road bridge at the entrance to the inlet of Rijeka Dubrovacka. Approaching from S, leave the rocky archipelago of Hridi Grebeni to starboard (the outermost islet has a lighthouse on it) and then the islet of Otocic Daksa to port. Pass N of the beacon of Plicina Vranac, which marks shoals extending for 200 metres off the coast and head towards the entrance to Rijeka Dubrovacka. As you approach the road bridge, the inlet leading S to the commercial harbour of Gruz opens up on starboard side.

If clearing in or intending to moor in Gruz, turn S into the inlet and continue for half a mile past the commercial quays, leaving a red buoy marking a shallow patch to port. The customs quay is to port at the end of the commercial quays and the small ‘marina’ of Gruz is just beyond it. If intending to moor at Marina Dubrovnik, see the approach instructions on the Marina Dubrovnik page.

Entrance

Yachts on Gruz quay

If clearing in, berth alongside on the customs quay. Customs are in the large building on the ferry quay, opposite the Hotel Petka. If the quay is full, you may have to wait for a clear space. Alternatively, there are berths with laid moorings for around 20 vessels stern/bows-to immediately S of the customs quay, which are operated as a so-called ‘marina’ (with prices to match). Pick up a mooring as directed. The moorings here are not very comfortable with all the passing traffic and the only advantage of being here is that you are close to the old town. Further along, the quay has been refurbished in recent years and yachts may berth alongside. Water and electricity points along the quay. Note that visiting yachts are not allowed in Stara Luka, the old harbour of Dubrovnik on the E side of the peninsula.

Berthing

Most visiting yachts, unless clearing in, berth upriver at the marina of Marina Dubrovnik. See above for alternatives.

Marinas & Yacht Clubs

Anchorages

None.

Yacht Repairs and Services

See Marina Dubrovnik.

Fuel, Water, & Electricity

Fuel station at Marina Dubrovnik. No fuel station at Gruz. Water and electricity points along the quay at Gruz and in Marina Dubrovnik.

Things to do Ashore

Tourism

Probably the first thing for any visitor to Dubrovnik is to take a tour around the perfectly preserved mediaeval walls, from which there are superb views over the red-tiled rooftops of the city, the old harbour and the Adriatic sea beyond. After touring the walls, the views as you enter the 16th century Pile gate, the main W gate of the old town, and stroll along Placa, the old town’s ‘main drag’, are memorable. To either side of Placa the narrow streets of the old town leading up to the walls are a delight to explore. ‘Must see’ sights include the cathedral, with a magnificent collection of reliquaries made by Dubrovnik gold and silversmiths; the church of St Blaise, with a silver-gilt statue of Dubrovnik’s patron saint, and the Franciscan Monastery, with charming cloisters and further stunning examples of gold and silver work from Dubrovnik craftsmen. The monastery also houses an ancient pharmacy in continuous operation since 1391 and one of Europe’s oldest. The Dominican Monastery museum at the NE end of the old town has yet more beautiful gold and silver work and wonderfully atmospheric cloisters. Also worth a visit is the late 15th century Rectors’ Palace with its imposing Renaissance loggia and impressive atrium. In all, the sights of the town require at least a two-day visit; three days is a more relaxing schedule.

Grocery & Supply Stores

Supermarket and other provisions shops in Gruz. Minimarket in Marina Dubrovnik.

Eateries

Restaurant Jadran courtyard
  • Numerous restaurants near the waterfront in Gruz and in the old town.
  • Restaurant and café in Marina Dubrovnik.
  • Restaurant Jadran (in the lovely cloisters of the former Convent of St Claire) is a great place for lunch.

Internet/WiFi

None.

Laundry

In Marina Dubrovnik.

Motorbike & Car Rentals

Numerous outlets in old town. In the marina, via the marina office.

Garbage Disposal

Bins near the harbour and in the marina.

Transportation

  • Buses to Dubrovnik old town and most Croatian cities
  • International buses to Frankfurt, Cologne and Munich
  • Ferries to the local islands, major Croatian harbours and Ancona, Pescara and Bari (Italy)
  • Domestic and international flights from Dubrovnik airport (25 kms)

Friends

Contact details of "Cruiser's Friends" that can be contacted for local information or assistance.

Forums

List links to discussion threads on partnering forums. (see link for requirements)

Links

For other useful websites, see Croatia.

References & Publications

See Croatia.

Comments

We welcome users' contributions to the Wiki. Please click on Comments to view other users' comments, add your own personal experiences or recommend any changes to this page following your visit.

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Date of member's last visit to Dubrovnik and this page's details validated:



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SailorSmiley.gifContributors to this page

Names: Lighthouse, Athene of Lymington, FANEROMENI


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